First year MA student’s Interim display at the Camberwell College of Arts Postgraduate Summer Show 2016

UAL_MAVA_CCA_PGshow2016As the summer heats up (well, we can hope) the graduate and post-graduate shows are happening all over the country. If you want to be amongst the first to see the most exciting new talent emerge, pop-in to see the  University of the Arts London’s (UAL) freshest graduates open up their work to the public. Visit the UAL summer shows – a series of free art, design, fashion, communication and performance exhibitions taking place across London.

Of particular personal interest are the up and coming artists and designers of tomorrow at the Camberwell College of Arts Post-graduate Summer Show, featuring work by graduating students from the MA Visual Arts courses:

Sharon Low is in the first year of the MA Visual Arts in Printmaking at the Camberwell College of Arts. MA Book Arts and MA Printmaking first year students are putting together an “interim display”, to give visitors a taster of the MA projects they are each concerned with.

The Private View is on Thursday 14 July 2016, from 6pm – 9pm.

The show is then open to the general public:

Friday 15 July – 10am – 8pm
Saturday 16 July – 11am – 5pm
Sunday 17 July – Closed
Monday 18 July – 10am – 8pm
Tuesday 19 July – 10am – 8pm
Wednesday 20 July- 10am – 8pm

Visit the UAL website for more information.

 

 

 

New English Art Club Annual Open Exhibition 2016

NEAC2016_h1-Quadrat-Simon-Thames-Path

The New English Art Club (NEAC) Annual Open Exhibition held at Mall Galleries opens to the public on Thursday 16 June and runs until Saturday 25 June 2016.

The NEAC Annual Open Exhibition is now firmly established as a fixture of the London Summer Season, exhibiting painting and drawing made from direct observation.

The exhibition includes painting, drawing and prints selected from an open submission alongside the work of member artists.

During its early years, the NEAC was well-known for its Impressionist style, and the influence of Impressionism and Post-Impressionism continues. More than a century since its inception, today the NEAC is regarded as a “well respected institution and one of the foremost exhibiting societies”, and today continues in a realistic, figurative style.

Tthe NEAC seeks work which “demonstrates excellence in both concept and draughtsmanship”, and views its place and aim as a “centre of excellence for drawing and painting”.  Current distinguished artists include Jason Bowyer PPNEAC PS RP, Melissa Scott Miller NEAC RP, Daniel Shadbolt NEAC, Diana Armfield RA NEAC Hon Rt RWS, Anthony Green NEAC LG RA Hon RBA Hon ROI and Ken Howard OBE PPNEAC RA RBA RBSA ROI RWA.

Visit the NEAC website to see the full list of exhibiting artists. All works are for sale and available to view online as well as in the gallery.

New English Art Club

References and further information:

Society of Women Artists 153rd Annual London Exhibition 2014

Society of Women Artists (SWA) logoThursday 26 June to Saturday 5 July
(closes 3.00 pm on the last day)
Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1

Private view: Wednesday 25th June 10.00 am – 8.00 pm
11.00 am – official opening and presentation of Awards

I’m delighted to again have work accepted for the Society of Women Artists annual exhibition this year, and even more excited to have been made an Associate member. This follows having works accepted over the past few years, and this year having six works accepted (the maximum of four to be hung and two accepted but not hung).

For an invitation to the private view and free entry throughout the duration of the show, please visit my website at www.sharonlow.com or send an email to exhibitions@sharonlow.com

I hope to see you there there!

About the Society of Women Artists (SWA)

SWA Flyer 2014Originally founded as the Society of Female Artists (SFA), this unique group has held an annual London exhibition of the work of women artists ever since 1857.

During the mid-nineteenth century, women were not considered serious contributors to the field of art and they had great difficulty in obtaining any public showing.

At the first exhibition of the SFA, 149 women showed 358 works. It is a reflection of the times that some of the artists hid their true identities for fear of social recrimination.

At this time the art world was dominated by the Royal Academy which, when founded in 1768, had just two women among the founders; there were no other women Royal Academicians for over 150 years, until Annie Swynnerton SWA (a member since 1889) was elected as an Associate in 1922.

Some of the most noted artists of the time were attracted to the Society: when Lady Elizabeth Butler’s “The Roll Call” was displayed at the Royal Academy in 1874, even Ruskin, with his peculiar views of femininity, revised his opinion that “no woman could paint”.

The SFA was involved in education for women artists: female artists were effectively excluded by the mores of the time from professional training – even for those who gained a place at art school, the model in the women’s class would be decorously draped on grounds of propriety.

As access to professional training increased, the Society’s exhibitions attained higher standards, and a name change came in 1869 to the Society of Lady Artists. The mid-Victorian persona was discarded in the last year of the century, and the twentieth century was embraced by the Society with the new name: The Society of Women Artists.

Among its members the Society has had many famous artists: Dame Laura Knight, the first woman Royal Academician for over 160 years, was elected President of the SWA in 1932;  Mabel Lucy Atwell, the world-famous illustrator, was also a member. Current members include Daphne Todd OBE, the first woman President of the Royal Portrait Society; June Mendoza OBE, the well-known portraitist June Mendoza; the late Suzanne Lucas, Past President of both the Society of Botanical Artists and the Royal Miniature Society (in 1980 was elected as the first woman president of a Royal Society); and Philomena Davis, elected first woman President of the Royal Society of British Sculptors in 1990.

The Society has enjoyed Royal patronage since 1865 and the current patron is HRH Princess Michael of Kent. The current President is Sue Jelley.

Beautifully crafted inspiring paper art

If I wasn’t already a fan of paper art, then I think Creative Bloq’s feature on the art form would have made me one. I can’t yet say which one is my favorite as there are so many wonderful examples even just in this article.

Yusuke Oono is a Japanese artist and designer  creating books that tell their stories in a multi-layered 3D scene, where each page is a separate laser cut plane, together making deep and gorgeous 3D images that reveal the story as you make your way from the front to the back of the book.

Japanese artist and designer Yusuke Oono's exquisite books with multi-layered 3D scenes

Japanese artist and designer Yusuke Oono’s exquisite books with multi-layered 3D scenes

See more of Yusuke Oono’s exquisite work:

http://www.loftwork.com/portfolios/oonoyusuke

http://www.thisiscolossal.com/2014/01/visual-narratives-cut-into-360-paper-books-by-yusuke-oono/

http://twistedsifter.com/2014/01/books-fan-out-into-360-degree-stories-yusuke-oono/

http://hifructose.com/2014/01/15/books-that-unfold-into-cut-paper-art-by-yusuke-oono/

Yulia Brodskaya combines classic design principles to create beautiful and thought-provoking visual fusions.

Yulia Brodskaya combines classic design principles to create beautiful and thought-provoking visual fusions.

Perhaps one of the most well-known of the contemporary designers working with paper art, Yulia Brodskaya’s art “brings together all the things she likes most: typography, paper, and highly detailed hand-made craft objects”. See more http://www.artyulia.com/

Yulia Brodskaya's colourful creations are bursting with life

Yulia Brodskaya’s colourful creations are bursting with life

 

I really love paper engineer Helen Friel’s Revolution “pop-up book”: it follows the cyclical journey of a single water droplet, and unsurprisingly took almost a year to make and shoot in one continuous take. This is a collaborative film by photographer Chris Turner, animator Jess Deacon and paper engineer Helen Friel.

Pam Langdon shows there’s much more that can be done with a book besides reading it. The paper sculptures are created by meticulously folding pages of old books, transforming them into eye-catching pieces of art, inspired by marine environments and patterns within nature.

Pam Langdon's paper sculptures are created with meticulously folded pages of old books

Pam Langdon’s paper sculptures are created with meticulously folded pages of old books

Langdon says of her work:

“They are transformed from a discarded and unloved existence. Intricate folding and rolling of their pages forms spirals symbolising movement and energy and reflecting growth patterns in nature. Casting shadows of their previous lives, they are cut and bound and metamorphosed into precious specimens. The labyrinth of folds and curls entices the reader for closer inspection of their mysterious new life.”

https://www.flickr.com/people/pam_langdon/

Zim&Zou's colourful paper creations have been used to promote recycling in Paris

Zim&Zou’s colourful paper creations have been used to promote recycling in Paris

Continuing the re-use and recycle theme, Zim & Zou’s colourful paper creations have been used to promote recycling in Paris with design agency June21. The Zim & Zou website could keep me transfixed for hours… http://www.zimandzou.fr/

Moscow is recreated with paper art by Matthew Picton.

Moscow is recreated with paper art by Matthew Picton.

UK-based artist Matthew Picton caused Creative Bloq to have their “minds … a little blown” by his finely crafted paper map sculptures. His maps are based on past events, and depict various cities in the midst of historical events, including fires, war and disease. Picton also takes the project further, by constructing the sculptures with paper connected with each event.

Blow your mind a little more when you visit his website: http://matthewpicton.com/paper-sculptures/paper-sculpture-gallery/

Nahoko Kojima somehow crafts some “truly original and awe-inspiring” paper scultpures from a single sheet of paper. Mind-bendingly the large-scale works are each hand-cut from a single sheet, “exploring themes of human existence, animals and the forces of nature.” Visit http://www.solokojima.com

Peace (2014) Paper Cut, handmade by Nahoko Kojima One Single Sheet Black Gold Japanese Washi

Peace (2014) Paper Cut, handmade by Nahoko Kojima One Single Sheet Black Gold Japanese Washi

Illustrator Eiko Ojala draws everything by hand to create the landscapes, figures and portraits that look as if they’ve been cut from paper.

Illustrator Eiko Ojala draws everything by hand to create the landscapes, figures and portraits that look as if they’ve been cut from paper.

Illustrator Eiko Ojala created ‘Vertical Landscape’ was digitally but without the aid of 3D software. Everything is drawn by hand to create the landscapes, figures and portraits that look as if they’ve been cut from paper. Nominated for the Young Illustrator Award at Berlin’s Illustrative festival, Creative Bloq summed it up: “this is only the beginning of a flourishing career for Eiko.”

I could go on, but while I inspire myself in doing so personally, do check out the Creative Bloq article for yourself – there are another 25 artists showcased in this fabulous article by Meryem Meg and the Creative Bloq staff

http://www.creativebloq.com/graphic-design/paper-art-1131666

 

Renaissance Impressions: Chiaroscuro woodcuts from the Collections of Georg Baselitz and the Albertina, Vienna

Of course I’m biased as a printmaker, but surely even non-printmakers can appreciate the amazing beauty in the Chiaroscuro woodcuts from two of the finest collections in the world currently on show at the Royal Academy.

Ugo da Carpi, after Raphael Archimedes (?) c. 1518-20 - Chiaroscuro woodcut printed from five blocks, the tone blocks in beige, pale brown, brown and blackish brown 44.5 x 34.7 cm Albertina, Vienna. Photo Albertina, Vienna. Organised by the Royal Academy of Arts, London and the Albertina, Vienna - RA website https://www.royalacademy.org.uk/exhibition/10

Ugo da Carpi, after Raphael Archimedes (?) c. 1518-20 – Chiaroscuro woodcut printed from five blocks, the tone blocks in beige, pale brown, brown and blackish brown 44.5 x 34.7 cm Albertina, Vienna. Photo Albertina, Vienna. Organised by the Royal Academy of Arts, London and the Albertina, Vienna – RA website https://www.royalacademy.org.uk/exhibition/10

These works were either conceived as “independent works or based on the designs of the greatest Renaissance artists such as Parmigianino, Raphael and Titian”. The pioneering 16th-century printing technique:

“breathed new life into well-known biblical scenes and legends; from Perseus slaying the Medusa to Aeneas Fleeing Troy, and the Miraculous Draught of Fishes.”

In this exhibition the RA has gathered 150 of the most exquisite and rare examples of this forgotten art form, with a focus on the chiaroscuro method and the craftsmanship of its proponents in Germany, Italy and the Netherlands, which created the first colour prints “that make dramatic use of light and dark.”

I am in awe at the beauty and technical perfection of these marvellous prints. The exhibition is on at the RA now and runs until June 8.

Take a look at the article and images for the “Renaissance Impressions” exhibition on the RA website: https://www.royalacademy.org.uk/exhibition/10

Design studio Angel Bomb’s exquisite Worker B Candles

Angel Bomb's Worker B designs

Angel Bomb’s Worker B designs

A stationery and packaging design junkie, I could only drool at the elegant hexagonal candle packaging, by design studio Angel Bomb, with its intricate laser cutting, and the ability to be tessellated together, reflecting the awesome work of the bees that produced the wax for these candles.

Angel Bomb's Worker B designs

Angel Bomb’s Worker B designs

Thia Shi Min highlights these lovely designs from Angel Bomb on designtaxi.com where the beautiful Nightshift Blue French Paper was treated with a subtly darker ink, a stunning contrast to the yellow of the beeswax candles inside.

Design Studio Angel Bomb said of this project:

“When we started developing packaging, we decided to focus on the bee’s process of collecting wax. Layered with different elements of the process, custom illustrated flowers climb around the label over the top of a laser cut honeycomb pattern. This movement alludes to the cycle the bees go through to collect this wax throughout their entire life.”

Angel Bomb's Worker B designs

Angel Bomb’s Worker B designs

Read Thia Shi Min article on designtaxi.com http://designtaxi.com/news/364342/Well-Crafted-Hexagonal-Candle-Packaging-That-Can-Be-Tessellated-Together/

Check out the Angel Bomb website for more information about this project and more of their work http://www.angelbomb.com/design-worker-b-candle

Master printmaker Norman Stevens at the Royal Academy

Norman Stevens ARA Painswick, Moonlight 1979 - Etching and aquatint Private collection © Estate of the artist - from the RA website https://www.royalacademy.org.uk/exhibition/16

Norman Stevens ARA Painswick, Moonlight 1979 – Etching and aquatint Private collection © Estate of the artist – from the RA website https://www.royalacademy.org.uk/exhibition/16

I’m looking forward to catching the RA exhibition of the works of the much admired Norman Stevens ARA, who originally trained as a painter alongside John Loker, David Hockney RA and David Oxtoby in the 1950s at Bradford College of Art. The exhibition features works from Stevens’ first black and white etchings to the large-scale prints he made in in the 1980s.

Norman Stevens ARA Levens Hall Garden 1985 - Screenprint Private collection © Estate of the artist from the RA website https://www.royalacademy.org.uk/exhibition/16

Norman Stevens ARA Levens Hall Garden 1985 – Screenprint Private collection © Estate of the artist, from the RA website https://www.royalacademy.org.uk/exhibition/16

Described on the RA website as “a master of the medium”, Stevens is a self-taught printmaker, and found in this work “an art form that perfectly suited his meticulous and subtle approach.”

Stevens’ prints “make use of colour, light and shade to powerful and often haunting effect” as he explores the built environment and landscape.

Indeed, the art critic, William Packer, likens Stevens’ work to a “game of hide-and-seek with the real world”, where “”human presence is always suggested but never shown.”

 

 

 

Norman Stevens ARA Morning 1973 - etching, aquatint and mezzotint Private collection © Estate of the artist, from the RA website https://www.royalacademy.org.uk/exhibition/16

Norman Stevens ARA Morning 1973 – etching, aquatint and mezzotint Private collection © Estate of the artist, from the RA website https://www.royalacademy.org.uk/exhibition/16

I’m looking forward to seeing “in the flesh” the prints that the RA describes as “at the heart of the exhibition” – the important groups of prints which include his depictions of Venetian blinds and ‘clapboard’ houses, as well as his “distinctive images of Stonehenge and his captivating views of English formal gardens.”

I can’t wait to discover  more about the work of this artist who developed, over the course of his career, “an international reputation for his technically brilliant and beguiling prints.”

The Norman Stevens ARA exhibition is on at the RA now and runs until May 25.

Read the RA article about the Norman Stevens exhibition https://www.royalacademy.org.uk/exhibition/16