Design studio Angel Bomb’s exquisite Worker B Candles

Angel Bomb's Worker B designs

Angel Bomb’s Worker B designs

A stationery and packaging design junkie, I could only drool at the elegant hexagonal candle packaging, by design studio Angel Bomb, with its intricate laser cutting, and the ability to be tessellated together, reflecting the awesome work of the bees that produced the wax for these candles.

Angel Bomb's Worker B designs

Angel Bomb’s Worker B designs

Thia Shi Min highlights these lovely designs from Angel Bomb on designtaxi.com where the beautiful Nightshift Blue French Paper was treated with a subtly darker ink, a stunning contrast to the yellow of the beeswax candles inside.

Design Studio Angel Bomb said of this project:

“When we started developing packaging, we decided to focus on the bee’s process of collecting wax. Layered with different elements of the process, custom illustrated flowers climb around the label over the top of a laser cut honeycomb pattern. This movement alludes to the cycle the bees go through to collect this wax throughout their entire life.”

Angel Bomb's Worker B designs

Angel Bomb’s Worker B designs

Read Thia Shi Min article on designtaxi.com http://designtaxi.com/news/364342/Well-Crafted-Hexagonal-Candle-Packaging-That-Can-Be-Tessellated-Together/

Check out the Angel Bomb website for more information about this project and more of their work http://www.angelbomb.com/design-worker-b-candle

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Master printmaker Norman Stevens at the Royal Academy

Norman Stevens ARA Painswick, Moonlight 1979 - Etching and aquatint Private collection © Estate of the artist - from the RA website https://www.royalacademy.org.uk/exhibition/16

Norman Stevens ARA Painswick, Moonlight 1979 – Etching and aquatint Private collection © Estate of the artist – from the RA website https://www.royalacademy.org.uk/exhibition/16

I’m looking forward to catching the RA exhibition of the works of the much admired Norman Stevens ARA, who originally trained as a painter alongside John Loker, David Hockney RA and David Oxtoby in the 1950s at Bradford College of Art. The exhibition features works from Stevens’ first black and white etchings to the large-scale prints he made in in the 1980s.

Norman Stevens ARA Levens Hall Garden 1985 - Screenprint Private collection © Estate of the artist from the RA website https://www.royalacademy.org.uk/exhibition/16

Norman Stevens ARA Levens Hall Garden 1985 – Screenprint Private collection © Estate of the artist, from the RA website https://www.royalacademy.org.uk/exhibition/16

Described on the RA website as “a master of the medium”, Stevens is a self-taught printmaker, and found in this work “an art form that perfectly suited his meticulous and subtle approach.”

Stevens’ prints “make use of colour, light and shade to powerful and often haunting effect” as he explores the built environment and landscape.

Indeed, the art critic, William Packer, likens Stevens’ work to a “game of hide-and-seek with the real world”, where “”human presence is always suggested but never shown.”

 

 

 

Norman Stevens ARA Morning 1973 - etching, aquatint and mezzotint Private collection © Estate of the artist, from the RA website https://www.royalacademy.org.uk/exhibition/16

Norman Stevens ARA Morning 1973 – etching, aquatint and mezzotint Private collection © Estate of the artist, from the RA website https://www.royalacademy.org.uk/exhibition/16

I’m looking forward to seeing “in the flesh” the prints that the RA describes as “at the heart of the exhibition” – the important groups of prints which include his depictions of Venetian blinds and ‘clapboard’ houses, as well as his “distinctive images of Stonehenge and his captivating views of English formal gardens.”

I can’t wait to discover  more about the work of this artist who developed, over the course of his career, “an international reputation for his technically brilliant and beguiling prints.”

The Norman Stevens ARA exhibition is on at the RA now and runs until May 25.

Read the RA article about the Norman Stevens exhibition https://www.royalacademy.org.uk/exhibition/16

Perfumes inspired by imaginary authors and books

Perfumer Josh Meyer has teamed up with artist Ashod Simonian to create the perfume collection, ‘Imaginary Authors’, that is packed with personality.

Perfumer Josh Meyer has teamed up with artist Ashod Simonian to create the perfume collection, ‘Imaginary Authors’, that is packed with personality.

Amanda Mok in her article on designtaxi.com showcases perfumer Josh Meyer’s and artist Ashod Simonian’s joint project to create the perfume collection, ‘Imaginary Authors’, that is “packed with personality”.

I find this work, and the story behind it, fun and quirky.

Apparently Meyer based each scent on a fictitious author he thought up, with accompanying stories of their lives and personalities. One such example is ‘The Soft Lawn’: “written by ‘Claude LeCoq’ while he was “attending Princeton University” which “has notes of ivy leaves, fresh tennis balls and clay court.”

Mok further notes that Simonian’s:

“charming old-school collages… as the bottle labels… were custom-made… to fit the personality of the authors and their inspired scents.”

Take a look at Amanda Mok’s article:
http://designtaxi.com/news/364700/Perfumes-Inspired-By-Authors-Books-Housed-In-Charming-Old-School-Bottles/

Where Are the People of Colour in Children’s Books?

Where Are the People of Color in Children’s Books?

“Where Are the People of Color in Children’s Books?” Walter Dean Myers’ article in the New York Times makes an interesting point:

“Of 3,200 children’s books published in 2013, just 93 were about black people, according to a study by the Cooperative Children’s Book Center at the University of Wisconsin.”

His article is thoughtful, insightful, personal and touching. His article takes you on his personal journey through life, which is at times troubled and painful. Finding characters to identify with in literature (or indeed film, music, art…) is not often questioned in this way. How many classic children’s books are about white people? “Snow White”, “Alice in Wonderland”, the C.S. Lewis Narnia stories… It’s not a criticism, more an observation.

Myers cites Joe Morton, the actor who starred in “The Brother From Another Planet,” who said that “all but a few motion pictures being made about blacks are about blacks as victims. In them, we are always struggling to overcome either slavery or racism. Book publishing is little better. Black history is usually depicted as folklore about slavery, and then a fast-forward to the civil rights movement. Then I’m told that black children, and boys in particular, don’t read. Small wonder… There is work to be done.”

How timely given the current films in the cinemas… I hadn’t really heard of Walter Dean Myers until I read this article, but now I’m going to search out his books and his artwork that he also mentions. This is something for me to think about more deeply as a creative artist. I hope you might too.

Check out his article in the New York Times >

Read the Cooperative Children’s Book Center report >

Intriguing comics and sweet illustrations from Talya Modlin

Illustrations from Talya Modlin

Illustrations from Talya Modlin

Talya Modlin dabbles in both comic book-making and quirky illustration as highlighted in an It’s Nice That post by Liv Siddall. As an artist baffled by art school crticism (dare I say, snobbery) about illustration and design, it’s refreshing to find Modlin’s drawings which are fun, lively and full of personality.

Illustrations from Talya Modlin

Illustrations from Talya Modlin

http://www.itsnicethat.com/articles/illustration-talya-modlin?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+itsnicethat%2FSlXC+%28It%27s+Nice+That%29

Celebrating motherhood through art

The Lots Road Group Motherhood Exhibition

The Lots Road Group Motherhood Exhibition

Kensington and Chelsea Today featured the The Lots Road Group, an association of portrait painters in Chelsea, with their free exhibition on ‘Motherhood’ at the Chelsea Library from Thursday 20 March until Mother’s Day, Sunday 30 March.

“The exhibition celebrates mothers, grandmothers and mothers-in-law featuring 16 portraits by a group of figurative artists who met while studying portraiture at the Heatherley School of Fine Art in Chelsea, which is one of the few art colleges in Britain to focus on portraiture, figurative painting and sculpture.”

Read the full article http://www.kensingtonandchelseatoday.co.uk/arts-and-culture/exhibitions/uzpy6g2er6.html

Artist Stella Tooth on remembering mothers and capturing motherhood

Artist Stella Tooth

Artist Stella Tooth

Artist Stella Tooth joined the occasional series on motherhood and creativity on www.storyofmum.com,  sharing how her art links to her experience of mothering, and talks about her upcoming group exhibition “Motherhood”.

The exhibition by the Lots Road Group takes place at the Chelsea Library, Kings Road, SW3 from Thursday, 20 March until Mother’s Day (30 March).

The exhibition is accompanied by a book which contains all the portraits featured in the exhibition which are executed in a variety of media from oils, acrylics and pastels to print.  Some were completed from life, others after death from studies and photographs. The book will be sold at the exhibition in aid of Oxfam’s Mothers Appeal.

The exhibition and the book also provide “a fascinating insight into the craft of portrait painting: from the artist who set aside her oils for speedier pastels to portray her mother with life-long back problems, to another who describes the quick work required to capture the likeness of a mother-in-law, suffering from Alzheimer’s, who would ‘forget’ her presence, to another who listened to the music she used to share with her mother to help her complete the portrait begun before her death. ”

The Heatherley School of Fine Art’s Principal Emeritus, John Walton RA, writes about the portrait he painted of his own mother in the foreword to the book.

The Lots Road Group was established to “facilitate camaraderie and provide a platform for exhibiting and maintaining professional networks.  In 2014 they have come together to create this tribute to motherhood.”

Read Stella’s article: http://www.storyofmum.com/content/remembering-mothers-capturing-motherhood-stella-tooth-2631

Visit Stella’s website: http://www.stellatooth.co.uk/

Please like the the Lots Road Group on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/thelotsroadgroup

Visit the Lots Road Group website blog at http://thelotsroadgroup.wordpress.com/

Mayor of London to investigate rising costs of artist studio space

artist-studio“There’s a lot of concern that London is changing and artists are being forced to move to new areas… artists are pioneers of regeneration because they go where others don’t. But they’re also the victims as they then get priced out.” – Munira Mirza, deputy mayor for education and culture in London

In an article in The Independent, City Hall flagged up the importance of the issue of the shortage of affordable studio space in the capital in a report published in 2010, but further investigation was shelved as preparations for the Olympics intensified.

The issue is now back on the agenda in an investigation by the Mayor of London, amid growing evidence that artists are being driven out by rising rents and redevelopment.

The development comes after it emerged that a former biscuit factory in Bermondsey, which hosts close to 400 artists, had been sold and will be converted into 800 flats.

This seems to be a consistent pattern, where run-down areas are affordable for artists, but as the area becomes “arty” and “trendy”, the prices go up with the following “gentrification” and artists are priced out and forced to move.

Read the article in The Independent  http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/art/news/mayor-to-investigate-as-artists-fear-being-driven-out-of-london-by-rising-costs-of-studio-space-9120150.html

VPROI Tim Benson, reviews the Motherhood Exhibition

Vice President of the Royal Society of Oil Painters, Tim Benson review Motherhood Exhibition

Vice President of the Royal Society of Oil Painters, Tim Benson review Motherhood Exhibition

Vice President of the Royal Society of Oil Painters, Tim Benson, reviews the Lots Road Group’s Motherhood Exhibition opening this week at the  Chelsea Old Town Hall in London.

He said of the group:

“They’ve come to a point now where they’ve found their language.. they are really very talented and it’s been a pleasure to know them.”

Watch the video in two parts (also available on YouTube)

Part 1: Martin Borough, Stella Tooth, Elizabeth Shields, Sarah Reynolds, Nichola Collins, Colleen Quill, Mark Stevenson, Christine Klein, Viviana Macchi, Sarah Moon

Part 2: Sharon Low, Alla Broeksmit, Lucinda Rendall, Hilary Puxley, Katherine Firth, Sarah Richardson

Artist: Redmer Hoekstra

Artist: Redmer Hoekstra

Redmer Hoekstra draws fascinating composite illustrations that merge animals and everyday objects or machines. His imagination ranges from an owl with books for wings to a lizard with computer keyboard scales; at times he even brings three or more forms together, as with a whale emerging from a submarine, the entirety of which has the appearance of a banana.

Artist: Redmer Hoekstra

Artist: Redmer Hoekstra

“Whether you regard the pieces as humorous or slightly disturbing, it’s hard to deny the ingenious way each creature is formed.” – thisiscolossal.com

Read more about Redmer Hoekstra http://www.thisiscolossal.com/2014/03/redmer-hoekstra/

Visit  Redmer Hoekstra’s website http://www.redmerhoekstra.nl/